Saturday, August 10, 2013

Gum Disease and Alzheimer's Crystal Lake Dentist

GUM DISEASE AND Alzheimer's

A new report found a link to Alzheimer's and a protein from a specific bacteria called P gingivalis which is common in gum disease . This laboratory study showed that gum disease bacteria lipopolysaccharides were found in the brain tissue of 4 out of 10 recently deceased people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and 0 out of 10 people without the condition.
This provides some, very limited, evidence to support the theory that in some people with Alzheimer’s, the bacteria responsible for gum disease may be playing a role in the disease.

 

 

GUM DISEASE AND HEART DISEASE*

HEART DISEASE


Several studies have shown that periodontal disease is associated with heart disease. While a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been proven, research has indicated that periodontal disease increases the risk of heart disease.
Scientists believe that inflammation caused by periodontal disease may be responsible for the association.
Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions. Patients at risk for infective endocarditis may require antibiotics prior to dental procedures. Your periodontist and cardiologist will be able to determine if your heart condition requires use of antibiotics prior to dental procedures.

STROKE

Additional studies have pointed to a relationship between periodontal disease and stroke. In one study that looked at the causal relationship of oral infection as a risk factor for stroke, people diagnosed with acute cerebrovascular ischemia were found more likely to have an oral infection when compared to those in the control group.
DIABETES AND PERIODONTAL DISEASE*
Diabetic patients are more likely to develop periodontal disease, which in turn can increase blood sugar and diabetic complications.
People with diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease than people without diabetes, probably because people with diabetes are more susceptible to contracting infections. In fact, periodontal disease is often considered a complication of diabetes. Those people who don't have their diabetes under control are especially at risk.
Research has suggested that the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease goes both ways - periodontal disease may make it more difficult for people who have diabetes to control their blood sugar.
Severe periodontal disease can increase blood sugar, contributing to increased periods of time when the body functions with a high blood sugar. This puts people with diabetes at increased risk for diabetic complications.
GUM DISEASE AND OTHER SYSTEMIC DISEASES*
OSTEOPOROSIS
Researchers have suggested that a link between osteoporosis and bone loss in the jaw. Studies suggest that osteoporosis may lead to tooth loss because the density of the bone that supports the teeth may be decreased, which means the teeth no longer have a solid foundation.
RESPIRATORY DISEASE

Research has found that bacteria that grow in the oral cavity can be aspirated into the lungs to cause respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, especially in people with periodontal disease.
*(This information reprinted from web page information on the website of the American Academy of Periodontology)

Call for an appointment today!

815 459 2202


 Dr. Neal answers all of your questions about Gum Disease at Crystal Lake Dental Associates.


Your comments are welcome

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About Me

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Born in the Midwest. Married with 6 children and 3 grandchildren. Attended Maine West High School, Harper Jr College, Northern Illinois University, the University of Illinois College of Dentistry. Practice in Crystal Lake, Illinois.